Blue Bicycle Books, Charleston, SC


Never Missed with Chris Covert, Tues., Jan. 15, 5:30 pm

Join us Tues., Jan. 15, 5:30 pm as Chris Covert will tell us the story behind his new book Never Missed (Warren Publishing, pb., 254 pp., $16), about his father Mark, a world-class long-distance runner who ran every day for exactly forty-five years.

What started as a hobby quickly became a life’s passion and a legacy for Mark Covert, holder of the second-longest running streak in history. He covered an astonishing 159,000 miles during the 16,436 consecutive days he kept The Streak alive. From his first national championship, to competing in the 1972 Olympic trials wearing the first pair of Nike shoes, Mark’s story is one of toughness, perseverance, and unwavering dedication to the sport of running.

Chris has spent fifteen years working with collegiate and professional athletes. A graduate of California State University, Fullerton and a student of Ken Ravizza, he has worked with athletes in High School, the NCAA [baseball, softball, football, soccer, cross country, and track & field], MLB, PGA, and NFL. As a former Head Coach at the NCAA level, he has worked with over 175 First Team All-Americans and over 250 All-Conference Athletes, along with being named a 9x Conference and Regional Coach of the Year. Chris now lives in Charleston and works as a motivational consultant.



Daughter of War Release Party with Brad Taylor, Sat. Jan. 20, 7 pm

Join celebrated local author Brad Taylor at Victor Social Club (39F John Street), Sat., Jan. 20, 7 pm. Brad will talk and sign copies of his latest thriller Daughter or War (Dutton, hb., 400 pp., $27).

About the book: Hot on the trail of a North Korean looking to sell sensitive US intelligence to the Syrian regime, Pike Logan and the Taskforce stumble upon something much graver: the sale of a lethal substance called Red Mercury.

Unbeknownst to the Taskforce, the Syrians plan to use the weapon of mass destruction against American and Kurdish forces, and blame the attack on terrorists, causing western nations to reassess their participation in the murky cauldron of the Syrian civil war.

Meanwhile, North Korea has its own devastating agenda: a double-cross that will dwarf the attack in Syria even as it lays the blame on the Syrian government. Leveraging Switzerland’s fame for secrecy and its vast network of military bunkers, now repurposed by private investors for the clandestine storage of wealth, North Korea will use Red Mercury to devastate the West’s ability to deliver further sanctions against the rogue regime.

As the Taskforce begins to unravel the plot, a young refugee unwittingly holds the key to the conspiracy. Hunted across Europe for reasons she cannot fathom, she is the one person who can stop the attack–if she can live long enough for Pike and Jennifer to find her.

Brad Taylor is the author of the New York Times bestselling Pike Logan series. He served for more than twenty years in the U.S. Army, including eight years in 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment–Delta, commonly known as Delta Force. He retired as a Special Forces Lieutenant Colonel and now lives in Charleston.

 



Native Place with Frank Harmon, Thurs., Jan. 17, 5 pm

Join us Thurs., Jan. 17, 5 pm as renowned architect Frank Harmon discusses his new book of sketches Native Places: Discovering a Way to See (ORO Edition, hb., 168 pp., $25).

Native Places is a collection of 64 watercolor sketches paired with mini-essays about architecture, landscape, everyday objects, and nature. The sketches relate the delight found in ordinary places. The short essays, rather than repeat what is visible in the sketch, illustrate ideas and thoughts sparked by that image and offer a fresh interpretation of ordinary things.

The goal of Native Places is, in part, to transform the way we see. Through its pages, barns become guidebooks to crops and weather; a country church is redolent of the struggle for civil rights and human dignity; and a highway rest stop offers a glimpse of egalitarian society.

Frank Harmon, FAIA, has designed sustainable modern buildings across the Southeast for 30 years. A graduate of the Architectural Association in London, Frank is a professor at the North Carolina State University College of Design. He has also taught at the Architectural Association and has served as a visiting critic at Harvard, the University of Virginia, and Auburn University’s Rural Studio.



Stones Ripe for Sowing with Libby Bernardin, Thur., Nov. 29, 5 pm

Join us Thurs., Nov. 29, 5 pm to celebrate the release of Libby Bernardin’s new poetry collection Stones Ripe for Sowing (Press 53, pb., 82 pp., $15). Libby will read a few of her poems and then stick around to sign books and answer questions.

Libby Bernardin has published two chapbooks, The Book of Myth (SC Poetry Initiative, 2009) and Layers of Song (Finishing Line Press, 2011). Her poems have appeared in Notre Dame ReviewAsheville Poetry ReviewSouthern Poetry ReviewCairn, Kakalak, Pinesong, and the Poetry Society of South Carolina Yearbooks. She is a Life Member of the Board of Governors of the South Carolina Academy of Authors, and a member of the Poetry Society of South Carolina and the North Carolina Poetry Society. Her poem “Transmigration” was nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize.

 



Author Luncheon with Patti Callahan, Becoming Mrs. Lewis, Sat., Oct. 27, 12 pm

Join us Sat., Oct. 27, 12 pm for lunch at Halls Signature Events (5 Faber St.), as Patti Callahan discusses Becoming Mrs. Lewis (Thomas Nelson, hb., 416 pp., $26).

Tickets are $32 for the three-course luncheon, or $60 to add a signed copy of the book.

Get tickets here.

At once a fascinating historical novel and a glimpse into a writer’s life, Becoming Mrs. Lewis is above all a love story. When poet and writer Joy Davidman began writing letters to C. S. Lewis—known as Jack—she was looking for spiritual answers, not love. Everything about New Yorker Joy seemed ill-matched for an Oxford don and the beloved writer of Narnia, yet their minds bonded over their letters. Embarking on the adventure of her life, Joy traveled from America to England and back again, facing heartbreak and poverty, discovering friendship and faith, and against all odds, finding a love that even the threat of death couldn’t destroy.

Patti Callahan (Patti Callahan Henry) is a New York Times bestselling author. Patti was a finalist in the Townsend Prize for Fiction, has been an Indie Next Pick, twice an OKRA pick, and a multiple nominee for the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) Novel of the Year. Patti attended Auburn University for her undergraduate work and Georgia State University for her graduate degree. The mother of three children, she lives in both Mountain Brook, Alabama, and Bluffton, South Carolina, with her husband.



The Lumberjack’s Dove with GennaRose Nethercott, Fri. Oct. 26, 8 pm

Join us Fri., Oct. 26, 8:00 pm to celebrate the release of GennaRose Nethercott‘s book of poetry The Lumberjack’s Dove (Ecco, pb., 96 pp. $15).

In the ingenious and vividly imagined narrative poem The Lumberjack’s Dove, a lumberjack cuts his hand off with an axe—however, instead of merely being severed, the hand shapeshifts into a dove. Inflected with the uncanny enchantment of modern folklore and animated by the sly shifting of points-of-view, The Lumberjack’s Dove is wise, richly textured poetry from a boundlessly creative new voice.

The Lumberjack’s Dove was selected by Louise Glück as a winner of the National Poetry Series for 2017. GennaRose’s other recent projects include A Ghost of Water and the narrative song collection Modern Ballads. She tours nationally and internationally composing poems-to-order for strangers on a 1952 Hermes Rocket typewriter.



Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin with Joseph Kelly, Tue., Oct. 30, 5 pm

Join us Tue., Oct. 30, 5:00 pm to celebrate the release of Joseph Kelly‘s new book Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin (Bloomsbury Publishing, hb., 512 pp., $32).

In Marooned, Joseph Kelly reexamines the history of Jamestown and comes to a radically different and decidedly American interpretation of these first Virginians. We all know the great American origin story. Fleeing religious persecution, the hardworking, pious Pilgrims thrived in the wilds of New England, where they built their fabled city on a hill. However, the epic origin of America was not an exodus and a fledgling theocracy. It is a tale of shipwrecked castaways of all classes marooned in the wilderness fending for themselves in any way they could–a story that illuminates who we are today.

Joseph Kelly is a professor of literature at the College of Charleston. He is the author of America’s Longest Siege: Charleston, Slavery, and the Slow March Toward Civil War, and the editor of the Seagull Reader series. He lives in Charleston, South Carolina.



Author Luncheon with Diane Chamberlain, The Dream Daughter, Fri., Oct. 5, 12 pm

Join us Fri., Oct. 5, 12 pm for lunch at Halls Signature Events (5 Faber St.), as Diane Chamberlain discusses The Dream Daughter (St. Martin’s Press, hb., 384 pp., $28).

Tickets are $32 for the three-course luncheon, or $62 to add a signed copy of the book.

Get tickets here.

The Dream Daughter is a rich, genre-spanning, breathtaking novel about one mother’s quest to save her child, unite her family, and believe in the unbelievable. When Carly Sears receives the news that her unborn baby girl has a heart defect, she is devastated. She is told that nothing can be done to help her child, but her brother-in-law tells her there is a way to save her baby. What he suggests is something that will shatter every preconceived notion that Carly has.

Diane Chamberlain is the international bestselling author of more than twenty novels, including The Dream Daughter, Necessary Lies, and The Silent Sister. She lives in North Carolina with her partner, photographer John Pagliuca, and her sheltie.



Trouble the Water with Jacqueline Friedland, Wed., Oct. 24, 6 pm

Join us Wed., Oct. 24, 6:00 pm to celebrate the release of Jacqueline Friedland‘s debut novel Trouble the Water (SparkPress, pb., 352 pp. $17).

Set against the vivid backdrop of Charleston twenty years before the Civil War, Trouble the Water is a captivating tale replete with authentic details about Charleston’s aristocratic planter class, American slavery, and the Underground Railroad. Abigail Milton was born into the British middle class, but her family has landed in unthinkable debt. To ease their burdens, Abby’s parents send her to America to live off the charity of their old friend, Douglas Elling. Just as she begins to grow comfortable in her new life, she overhears her benefactor planning the escape of a local slave―and suddenly, everything she thought she knew about Douglas Elling is turned on its head.

Jacqueline Friedland holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and a JD from NYU Law School. She practiced as an attorney in New York before returning to school to receive her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College. She lives in New York with her husband, four children, and a tiny dog.



Mississippi Vegan with Timothy Pakron, Sat., Oct. 27, 5 pm

Join us Sat., Oct. 27, 5:00 pm to celebrate the release of Timothy Pakron‘s debut cookbook Mississippi Vegan (Avery, hb., 288 pp. $35).

Inspired by the landscape and flavors of his childhood on the Mississippi gulf coast, Timothy Pakron shares 125 plant-based recipes, all of which substitute ingredients without sacrificing depth of flavor and reveal the secret tradition of veganism in southern cooking. Finding ways to re-create his experiences growing up in the South on the plate, Pakron looks to history and nature as his guides to creating the richest food possible.

Timothy Pakron is a passionate cook, artist, and photographer, and the creator of the blog Mississippi Vegan. Before devoting himself to the culinary arts, he spent time as a fine artist in Charleston, South Carolina, and New York City. He currently lives and works in New Orleans.