Blue Bicycle Books, Charleston, SC


Events and Signings

Sat., Oct. 20Busy Philipps, This Will Only Hurt a Little 

Wed., Oct. 24 Jacqueline Friedland, Trouble the Waters

Thurs., Oct. 25 Nina Collins, What Would Virginia Woolf Do?

Fri., Oct. 26 GennaRose Nethercott, The Lumberjack’s Dove

Sat., Oct. 27 — Author Luncheon with Patti Callahan, Becoming Mrs. Lewis

Sat., Oct. 27 Tim Pakron, Mississippi Vegan 

Tue., Oct. 30 Joseph Kelly, Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin

Wed., Nov. 7 Dinner with Anissa Helou at Butcher & Bee 

Fri. & Sat., Nov. 9-10 YALLFest!

Thurs., Nov 29 — Libby Bernadin, Stones Ripe for S0wing

Fri., Nov. 30 — Author Luncheon with H.W. Brands, Heirs of the Founders

Fri., Dec. 7 — Author Luncheon with Adam Parker, Outside Agitator



Author Luncheon with H.W. Brands, Heirs of the Founders, Fri., Nov. 30, 12 pm

Join us Fri., Nov. 30, 12 pm for lunch at Halls Signature Events (5 Faber St.), as H.W. Brands discusses his new book Heirs of the Founders (Doubleday, hb., 432 pp., $30).

From New York Times bestselling historian H. W. Brands comes the riveting story of how, in nineteenth-century America, a new set of political giants battled to complete the unfinished work of the Founding Fathers and decide the future of our democracy. Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, a champion orator known for his eloquence, spoke for the North and its business class. Henry Clay of Kentucky, as dashing as he was ambitious, embodied the hopes of the rising West. South Carolina’s John Calhoun, with piercing eyes and an even more piercing intellect, defended the South and slavery.

They wrestled with these issues for four decades, arguing bitterly and hammering out political compromises that held the Union together, but only just. Then, in 1850, when California moved to join the Union as a free state, “the immortal trio” had one last chance to save the country from the real risk of civil war. But, by that point, they had never been further apart. Thrillingly and authoritatively, H. W. Brands narrates an epic American rivalry and the little-known drama of the dangerous early years of our democracy.

H.W. Brands taught at Texas A&M University for sixteen years before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History. His books include Traitor to His Class, Andrew Jackson, The Age of Gold, The First American, and TR. Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.

 

 



Stones Ripe for Sowing with Libby Bernadin, Thur., Nov. 29, 5 pm

Join us Thurs., Nov. 29, 5 pm to celebrate the release of Libby Bernadin’s new poetry collection Stones Ripe for Sowing (Press 53, pb., 82 pp., $15). Libby will read a few of her poems and then stick around to sign books and answer questions.

Libby Bernardin has published two chapbooks, The Book of Myth (SC Poetry Initiative, 2009) and Layers of Song (Finishing Line Press, 2011). Her poems have appeared in Notre Dame ReviewAsheville Poetry ReviewSouthern Poetry ReviewCairn, Kakalak, Pinesong, and the Poetry Society of South Carolina Yearbooks. She is a Life Member of the Board of Governors of the South Carolina Academy of Authors, and a member of the Poetry Society of South Carolina and the North Carolina Poetry Society. Her poem “Transmigration” was nominated for a 2017 Pushcart Prize.

 



Author Luncheon with Patti Callahan, Becoming Mrs. Lewis, Sat., Oct. 27, 12 pm

Join us Sat., Oct. 27, 12 pm for lunch at Halls Signature Events (5 Faber St.), as Patti Callahan discusses Becoming Mrs. Lewis (Thomas Nelson, hb., 416 pp., $26).

Tickets are $32 for the three-course luncheon, or $60 to add a signed copy of the book.

Get tickets here.

At once a fascinating historical novel and a glimpse into a writer’s life, Becoming Mrs. Lewis is above all a love story. When poet and writer Joy Davidman began writing letters to C. S. Lewis—known as Jack—she was looking for spiritual answers, not love. Everything about New Yorker Joy seemed ill-matched for an Oxford don and the beloved writer of Narnia, yet their minds bonded over their letters. Embarking on the adventure of her life, Joy traveled from America to England and back again, facing heartbreak and poverty, discovering friendship and faith, and against all odds, finding a love that even the threat of death couldn’t destroy.

Patti Callahan (Patti Callahan Henry) is a New York Times bestselling author. Patti was a finalist in the Townsend Prize for Fiction, has been an Indie Next Pick, twice an OKRA pick, and a multiple nominee for the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA) Novel of the Year. Patti attended Auburn University for her undergraduate work and Georgia State University for her graduate degree. The mother of three children, she lives in both Mountain Brook, Alabama, and Bluffton, South Carolina, with her husband.



The Lumberjack’s Dove with GennaRose Nethercott, Fri. Oct. 26, 8 pm

Join us Fri., Oct. 26, 8:00 pm to celebrate the release of GennaRose Nethercott‘s book of poetry The Lumberjack’s Dove (Ecco, pb., 96 pp. $15).

In the ingenious and vividly imagined narrative poem The Lumberjack’s Dove, a lumberjack cuts his hand off with an axe—however, instead of merely being severed, the hand shapeshifts into a dove. Inflected with the uncanny enchantment of modern folklore and animated by the sly shifting of points-of-view, The Lumberjack’s Dove is wise, richly textured poetry from a boundlessly creative new voice.

The Lumberjack’s Dove was selected by Louise Glück as a winner of the National Poetry Series for 2017. GennaRose’s other recent projects include A Ghost of Water and the narrative song collection Modern Ballads. She tours nationally and internationally composing poems-to-order for strangers on a 1952 Hermes Rocket typewriter.



Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin with Joseph Kelly, Tue., Oct. 30, 5 pm

Join us Tue., Oct. 30, 5:00 pm to celebrate the release of Joseph Kelly‘s new book Marooned: Jamestown, Shipwreck, and a New History of America’s Origin (Bloomsbury Publishing, hb., 512 pp., $32).

In Marooned, Joseph Kelly reexamines the history of Jamestown and comes to a radically different and decidedly American interpretation of these first Virginians. We all know the great American origin story. Fleeing religious persecution, the hardworking, pious Pilgrims thrived in the wilds of New England, where they built their fabled city on a hill. However, the epic origin of America was not an exodus and a fledgling theocracy. It is a tale of shipwrecked castaways of all classes marooned in the wilderness fending for themselves in any way they could–a story that illuminates who we are today.

Joseph Kelly is a professor of literature at the College of Charleston. He is the author of America’s Longest Siege: Charleston, Slavery, and the Slow March Toward Civil War, and the editor of the Seagull Reader series. He lives in Charleston, South Carolina.



Author Luncheon with Diane Chamberlain, The Dream Daughter, Fri., Oct. 5, 12 pm

Join us Fri., Oct. 5, 12 pm for lunch at Halls Signature Events (5 Faber St.), as Diane Chamberlain discusses The Dream Daughter (St. Martin’s Press, hb., 384 pp., $28).

Tickets are $32 for the three-course luncheon, or $62 to add a signed copy of the book.

Get tickets here.

The Dream Daughter is a rich, genre-spanning, breathtaking novel about one mother’s quest to save her child, unite her family, and believe in the unbelievable. When Carly Sears receives the news that her unborn baby girl has a heart defect, she is devastated. She is told that nothing can be done to help her child, but her brother-in-law tells her there is a way to save her baby. What he suggests is something that will shatter every preconceived notion that Carly has.

Diane Chamberlain is the international bestselling author of more than twenty novels, including The Dream Daughter, Necessary Lies, and The Silent Sister. She lives in North Carolina with her partner, photographer John Pagliuca, and her sheltie.



Trouble the Water with Jacqueline Friedland, Wed., Oct. 24, 6 pm

Join us Wed., Oct. 24, 6:00 pm to celebrate the release of Jacqueline Friedland‘s debut novel Trouble the Water (SparkPress, pb., 352 pp. $17).

Set against the vivid backdrop of Charleston twenty years before the Civil War, Trouble the Water is a captivating tale replete with authentic details about Charleston’s aristocratic planter class, American slavery, and the Underground Railroad. Abigail Milton was born into the British middle class, but her family has landed in unthinkable debt. To ease their burdens, Abby’s parents send her to America to live off the charity of their old friend, Douglas Elling. Just as she begins to grow comfortable in her new life, she overhears her benefactor planning the escape of a local slave―and suddenly, everything she thought she knew about Douglas Elling is turned on its head.

Jacqueline Friedland holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and a JD from NYU Law School. She practiced as an attorney in New York before returning to school to receive her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College. She lives in New York with her husband, four children, and a tiny dog.



Mississippi Vegan with Timothy Pakron, Sat., Oct. 27, 5 pm

Join us Sat., Oct. 27, 5:00 pm to celebrate the release of Timothy Pakron‘s debut cookbook Mississippi Vegan (Avery, hb., 288 pp. $35).

Inspired by the landscape and flavors of his childhood on the Mississippi gulf coast, Timothy Pakron shares 125 plant-based recipes, all of which substitute ingredients without sacrificing depth of flavor and reveal the secret tradition of veganism in southern cooking. Finding ways to re-create his experiences growing up in the South on the plate, Pakron looks to history and nature as his guides to creating the richest food possible.

Timothy Pakron is a passionate cook, artist, and photographer, and the creator of the blog Mississippi Vegan. Before devoting himself to the culinary arts, he spent time as a fine artist in Charleston, South Carolina, and New York City. He currently lives and works in New Orleans.



Winter in Paradise with Elin Hilderbrand, Mon., Oct. 8, 5:30 pm

Join us Mon., Oct. 8, 5:30 pm to celebrate the release of Elin Hilderbrand‘s new novel Winter in Paradise (Little, Brown and Co., hb., 320 pp., $28).

Winter in Paradise has everything that readers have come to know and love about an Elin Hilderbrand novel, plus a healthy dose of intrigue. Irene Steele’s idyllic life is shattered when she is woken up by a late-night phone call. Her beloved husband has been found dead. As Irene investigates the mysterious circumstances of her husband’s death, she is plunged into a web of intrigue and deceit belied by the pristine white sand of the Caribbean beaches of St. John.

Elin Hilderbrand lives on Nantucket with her husband and their three young children. She grew up in Collegeville, Pennsylvania, and traveled extensively before settling on Nantucket, which has been the setting for her five previous novels. Hilderbrand is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and the graduate fiction workshop at the University of Iowa.

 

 

 



This Will Only Hurt a Little with Busy Philipps, Sat., Oct. 20, 7 pm

Since falling in love with Charleston while filming Vice Principals, Busy Philipps has returned with her family many times. Join us in welcoming her back to the Lowcountry, Sat., Oct. 20, 7 pm, at the Charleston Museum, as we celebrate the release of her book This Will Only Hurt a Little (Touchstone, Oct. 2018, hb., 320 pp).

Tickets include a hardback copy of This Will Only Hurt a Little, pre-signed by the author. 

Moderator TBA.

About the book: A hilarious, heartfelt, and refreshingly honest memoir by the beloved comedic actress known for her roles on Freaks and GeeksDawson’s Creek, and Cougar Town who has become “the breakout star of Instagram stories…Imagine I Love Lucy mixed with a modern lifestyle guru” (The New Yorker).

“You guys!! Busy is a legit writer with a voice as clear as a bell. This book is honest, funny, intimate, and well-observed by a person who has observed some sh*t.” —Tina Fey

“Judy Blume meets Karl Ove Knausgaard meets one brave woman from Arizona. On the page, Philipps’ toughness shines through—a rare and feminine ethical code; devoted and blunt. It’s a thrill to watch her stumble right up until the very moment she storms the f*cking gates.” —Miranda July

Busy Philipps is an actress best known for roles in cult TV classics like Dawson’s Creek, Freaks & Geeks, Cougar Town, ER, and most recentlyHBO’s Vice Principals. She has appeared in fan-favorite films such as Made of Honor, I Don’t Know How She Does It, He’s Just Not That Into You, White Chicks, and The Gift. She also was one of the writers of the hit film Blades of Glory. Busy lives in Los Angeles with her husband and their two daughters.